Doing History in the Age of Downton Abbey - (Journal of British Cinema and Television) by Christine Geraghty & Julie Anne Taddeo (Paperback)
$24.99
Shop on Target

Price Comparison

Description

About the Book Addresses how academic historians engage with Downton Abbey and similar programmes on a personal, intellectual, and professional basis. As representations of history, period dramas perform serious work, and can be used to discuss both historical and contemporary issues (voting rights, war and trauma, reproductive rights). Book Synopsis Addresses how academic historians engage with Downton Abbey and similar programmes on a personal, intellectual, and professional basis As representations of history, period dramas perform serious work, and can be used to discuss both historical and contemporary issues (voting rights, war and trauma, reproductive rights). The contributors challenge the narrow view of period drama TV as conservative nostalgia; through sharing their experiences with these series (as consultants, bloggers and public speakers) they suggest ways in which historians can navigate the boundaries between academic and public history. Key Features Gives personal accounts of the ways US historians have been publicly in work on one of the most talked-about television dramas Looks at Downton Abbey from historians' perspectives, not to challenge its historical accuracy but to explore how it works as popular history Explores the divide between public and academic history Brings together British and American historians to help us understand how British popular culture is used and consumed in different ways From the Back Cover Addresses how academic historians engage with Downton Abbey and similar programmes on a personal, intellectual, and professional basis As representations of history, period dramas perform serious work, and can be used to discuss both historical and contemporary issues (voting rights, war and trauma, reproductive rights). The contributors challenge the narrow view of period drama TV as conservative nostalgia; through sharing their experiences with these series (as consultants, bloggers and public speakers) they suggest ways in which historians can navigate the boundaries between academic and public history. Key Features - Gives personal accounts of the ways US historians have been publicly in work on one of the most talked-about television dramas - Looks at Downton Abbey from historians' perspectives, not to challenge its historical accuracy but to explore how it works as popular history - Explores the divide between public and academic history - Brings together British and American historians to help us understand how British popular culture is used and consumed in different ways About the Author Julie Anne Taddeo teaches British history at University of Maryland, College Park, USA. She is the author of Lytton Strachey and the Search for Modern Sexual Identity (Haworth, 2002); She has edited and co-edited the following collections: Upstairs and Downstairs: British Costume Drama Television from The Forsyte Saga to Downton Abbey (with James Leggott; Rowman and Littlefield, 2014); Steaming into a Victorian Future: A Steampunk Anthology (with Cynthia J. Miller, Scarecrow, 2012); Catherine Cookson Country: On the Borders of Legitimacy, Fiction and History (Ashgate 2012); The Tube Has Spoken: Reality TV and History (with Ken Dvorak, University Press of Kentucky, 2009). She is an Associate Editor for The Journal of Popular Television (published by Intellect) and is Secretary of the Middle Atlantic Conference on British Studies (MACBS).

logo

Target

You may also like