Bantu Presbyterian Church of South Africa - (Scottish Religious Cultures) by Graham A Duncan (Hardcover)
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About the Book Examines the Free Church of Scotland Mission in South Africa Book Synopsis This book traces the development of the Scottish Presbyterian mission from 1824 until the formation of the Bantu Presbyterian Church of South Africa in 1923 as the first South African outcome of the three-self movement. It considers the development of this autonomous church, supported by the Free Church of Scotland until 1929, and the Church of Scotland thereafter in the light of its ongoing missionary purpose until its union with the Presbyterian Church of Southern Africa in 1999. Drawing from archival sources, Graham A. Duncan documents the history of South African Christianity in the context of racial segregation and apartheid. The book foregrounds the distinguished history of Scottish Presbyterianism in South Africa. It also presents a significant part of the church history of Scotland, beyond its borders, highlighting the important role played by indigenous Christians in the growth of global Christianity. From the Back Cover Examines the Free Church of Scotland Mission in South Africa This book traces the development of the Scottish Presbyterian mission from 1824 until the formation of the Bantu Presbyterian Church of South Africa in 1923 as the first South African outcome of the three-self movement. It considers the development of this autonomous church, supported by the Free Church of Scotland until 1929, and the Church of Scotland thereafter in the light of its ongoing missionary purpose until its union with the Presbyterian Church of Southern Africa in 1999. Drawing from archival sources, Graham A. Duncan documents the history of South African Christianity in the context of racial segregation and apartheid. The book foregrounds the distinguished history of Scottish Presbyterianism in South Africa. It also presents a significant part of the church history of Scotland, beyond its borders, highlighting the important role played by indigenous Christians in the growth of global Christianity. Graham A. Duncan is Research Fellow in the Department of Church History, Christian Spirituality and Missiology at the University of South Africa. About the Author Graham A. Duncan is Research Associate at the University of South Africa. Previously, he served as Emeritus Professor of Church History and Church Polity at the University of Pretoria. He is a member of the South African Missiological Society (SAMS) and the Church History Society of Southern Africa. He was also a member of the South African Council for Theological Education. He is the author of over hundred peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and the author of Coercive Agency: Power and Resistance in Mission Education, Pietermaritzburgh: Cluster Publications, 2003 and co-author (with Denis P.) of The Native School that Caused all the Trouble: A History of the Federal Theological Seminary of Southern Africa, Pietermaritzburgh: Cluster Publications, 2012.

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