Essential ingredients you shouldn't cook without

(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)When it comes to brands, you might say those of us at Bon Appétit are particular. We don’t bake brownies with just any chocolate, or sprinkle our eggs with just any salt. Rather, we choose the ingredients we use every day based on reliability, flavor, and value (and, sure, sometimes they come in gorgeous packaging).

They’re so important to the way we cook that we decided to make it official—with a seal of approval. Used correctly, these 12 items will upgrade every aspect of your culinary life, guaranteed.

A few notes about the seal

1. This is just the beginning. In addition to the 12 products on the list you’re about to read, more will be approved each year.
2. That means you’ll be seeing the BA seal in future issues, on our Web site, even at the grocery store, affixed to the labels of our winners.
3. Whenever you spy the BA seal, you can be sure that our staff has tasted, vetted, and kicked the tires on every aspect of that product, including value, so you can feel confident that you’re getting your money’s worth and that it will make your cooking (and baking, and grilling) better.
4. We hope you’ll trust the BA seal as steadfastly as you trust the recipes that keep you coming back to Bon Appétit every month. And with that, let’s meet the winners (presented in no particular order):



Heinz Ketchup ($3.29/40 oz.)

When it comes to ketchup, homemade is not an improvement. This is what it should taste like. If you’ve ever dared to stray from the 1876 standard-bearer, you know why associate food editor Chris Morocco says of such a reckless move: “It’s  not going to end well.”


Barilla Pasta (various shapes, prices)
(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)

Dried pasta is, of course, a cornerstone of any pantry—and a category on which we were eager to find consensus. There were plenty of predictions about which brand would win, but Barilla was a slam dunk.  Its strands are smooth, the shapes have real definition, the flavor was spot-on, and the pasta holds al dente better than other brands.



(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)Philadelphia Cream Cheese  ($2.59/8 oz.)

There’s a reason why professional pastry chefs lean on Philly: reliability. Its perfect balance of fat means that whether you’re baking or whipping up a frosting, the cream cheese’s emulsification won’t break or curdle—which is especially key when cheesecake is on the line.





Domino Sugar ($2.49/2 lb.)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)

Because we use sugar (maybe too) often, we prefer ours as pure as possible (harvested from natural cane, not beets) and rich with history (Domino’s first refinery opened more than 200 years ago). West Coasters: Look for C&H.

(See also: Supermarket standoff: barbecue sauces)












(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)Hellmann’s Mayonnaise ($4.79/30 oz.)

Truth: All good things can be traced back to New York delis. Exhibit 1A? This famously blue-ribboned jar was first sold in 1905 at a sandwich shop on  the Upper West Side. Homemade mayo has its virtues, but we crave the comfort of knowing that our BLTs and coleslaw will taste exactly the way they tasted last year, last decade, last century. Look for Best Foods west of the Rockies.

 
(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)(Photo by Tom Schierlitz)




San Marzano Canned Tomatoes ($3.99/28 oz.)

Grown in the U.S. from prized San Marzano seeds imported from Italy, these brightly flavored tomatoes are meaty, sweet, and tailor-made for a simple pomodoro sauce. (This brand also won for tomato concentrate.)





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