5 reasons to skip layaway

Kiplinger

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(Photo: Getty Images News / Justin Sullivan)

(Photo: Getty Images News / Justin Sullivan)

This installment-payment plan can help consumers avoid racking up debt when making holiday purchases, but it has its drawbacks.

Layaway has been making a comeback since the recession. In fact, it's been in the headlines recently because several stores that offer this installment-payment program are reducing or dropping layaway service fees.

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Layaway allows customers to select items they want and pay for them over a period of time. Once final payments are made, items may be picked up. The difference between using a layaway program and a credit card (which can let you stretch payments out over a period of time) is that interest doesn't accrue on layaway items. However, you must pay a nominal service fee and a deposit at the time of purchase.

Considering that some major retailers are eliminating (or lowering) their service fees, should you consider layaway to purchase holiday gifts without racking up debt? Consumer expert Andrea Woroch says there are five reasons this payment method might not be right for you.

1. Some stores still charge fees.

Kmart's layaway FAQs state that an 8 week contract requires a $5 service fee, while a 12 week contract will cost you a $10 fee. Toys "R" Us requires a $5 set-up fee. Walmart is currently offering a "no opening" fee deal until Dec. 15th.

(More from Kiplinger: Best Things to Wait Until Black Friday to Buy)

2. Canceling will cost you.

Retailers charge a cancellation fee, ranging from $5 to $15, if you decide not to go through with your layaway purchase. Add this to the nonrefundable $5 service or initiation fee, and you've lost up to $20.

3. You might be paying a higher price.

If you put items on layaway now so that they'll be paid off by the holidays, you'll likely be buying them at full price. There's a good chance that the price on those items will be marked down on Black Friday or in December. So ask the retailer whether you can get the lower price on a product if it goes on sale after you've placed it on layaway. If not, you could be better off saving up over the next two months to pay for the item with cash when it's discounted.

4. You're committing to pay for something with money you might not have.

Just because you're stretching out payments over several weeks doesn't mean you won't end up in a financial hole, Woroch says. If putting an item on layaway is the only way you can afford it, you might not have the cash to pay for it if an emergency arises and puts a strain on your finances.

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5. Using your credit card might be more rewarding.

Using plastic for your purchase might be a better option if you have a rewards credit card and are disciplined about paying off your balance each month. You could earn cash back, which could help pay for holiday gifts, or earn travel points to offset the cost of holiday travel.

Unless there's an item you expect to sell out before the holidays, consider creating your own layaway system rather than paying retailers fees to use theirs.

Research the price of item you want to purchase then use an envelope or jar to set aside a little each week so that you'll have enough cash to purchase it by the holidays. At that point, it might be on sale and you'll have enough money left over to get a head start on your holiday savings for next year (or to pay down debt, create an emergency fund, boost retirement savings and the list goes on).

 

More from Kiplinger:
11 Great Gadget Gifts for 2014
What Not to Buy at Warehouse Clubs
The Worst Things to Buy at Trader Joe's



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